Here At the End of All Things

Here At the End of All Things

As I type this, I can barely believe that it is August. Internships have ended. Classes are over. Grades are coming in. We are all alumni of The Washington Center. It's really hard to wrap my mind around. It seems like only yesterday that I was putting up my first entry about the struggle it was to get here. And now as I type my last, I am reminded of what an amazing summer this has truly been. So many new doors have been opened for me. I've made friends that will last a lifetime. And I feel that I have grown as a person more than in any other summer of my undergraduate career. That said, I wanted to spend this entry just reflecting on the good times and summarizing some points I've made all summer.

 

First of all, the Metro is a beast you just have to take in strides. Step back, the doors ARE indeed closing! Stay on the right side of that escalator if you're going to stand. And, make sure you have 20 minutes or so built-in to your commute, just in case the Metro decides to go haywire. And to keep you company, always grab a copy of the Express on your way into the Metro. I've picked up a copy from the same lady at my Metro stop all summer and I've never been disappointed. Maybe that's because Lady Gaga graced the cover of my first copy of the Metro. Regardless, it's the world's most interesting little paper.

Next, make sure you get out of the city. In case I haven't mentioned it enough this summer, my favorite place to go and just clear my head was Great Falls Park. It's just about a 25 minute drive from College Park, MD, where I've been living and you just won't regret it. I went three times this summer and I loved every minute. Sure, DC is great and I'm sure you could spend every single day here. But my guess is, you will want to get away every now and then. So do what I and friends did, just get out!

Next, really make the most of your internship. I can honestly say that this summer has opened career doors for me that I never would have imagined. Go to all the meet and greets you can find. Say hello to anyone and everyone. Maybe even drop a business card! Whether you're on Capitol Hill or working in one of the Smithsonians, there are connections to be made. And make sure you give thank you cards at the end of it all! That small hand-written card may not seem like a lot, but it means leaving a physical piece of yourself behind. I've remembered to give mine out, so I'm sure the picture below will be my view every day sometime next year. I truly can't wait.

And finally, the only way to truly survive the summer, is just to make friends. You'll meet that core group at orientation or in your first few days at your internship. Stick with them. Have fun. Go crazy! Well, maybe not too crazy. But I'm sure you get the picture. I would not have been able to live through the summer without the four below. We learned together. We laughed together. We loved together. You might think it's cliche, but I know it's the truth. You won't like everyone, but you've got to like someone! And I know I would have not grown nearly as much if it hadn't been for Jordan, Leah, Katy, and Keya. Love you all!

Well now that I'm starting to shed tears, I suppose it's time to wrap this thing up. In case I haven't been clear enough, this has been one of the most amazing summers of my entire life. The people, the places, and the experiences are all things I will never forget. More importantly, I know now that a summer in DC is all what you make of it. What you put into your friends, your internship, and your experience is what you will get back. Always remember that. I put my all in; and I think I'll be getting all that and more back. But until then, it's back to school for me! I'm off to finish my senior year and then rush back here to the center of the free world! Thanks to all of you who have read and followed me! I hope I have not disappointed. And I hope that you choose to make the same decision as I did. No regrets, just love.

~ All the Best Wishes, Todd

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