World Bank

World Bank

You can have some pretty amazing and unique experiences through TWC. So far I have been part of the #WithSyria vigil at the Capitol Reflecting Pool, visited Human Rights Campaign, was able to network with truly inspiring professionals and this morning we visited the World Bank. Some of you might not find this very interesting, but as an international relations student, this was a pretty big deal for me. Visiting one of the largest international institutions in the world is a once in a lifetime opportunity (unless I luck out and get a job there), one you should grasp with both hands.

 

We met up with the other postgrads at the visitors' entrance. I had seen the building from the outside and expected some grand lobby, but seeing as this was the visitors' entrance, we were met with a poorly lit room and metal detectors instead. After we were all thoroughly screened and they decided that we were good to go, we were allowed access to the main building! The actual building couldn't be more different from the visitors' entrance. The lobby is a large, open and very light space, because almost the entire building is made of glass. Compared to the little area we had just exited, the lobby almost seemed futuristic. While we were walking through the lobby to our destination, we spotted two other postgrads who were trying to get in through the employees' entrance. How they managed to use that entrance instead of the visitors' entrance, I'll never know!

 

Our group at the World Bank

Our group at the World Bank

 

At the World Bank we got a thorough presentation about how the World Bank works, where they work and which institutions make up the World Bank Group, along with a few well-placed jabs at the IMF right across the street. It was kind of sobering to realize that we had dealt with the World Bank last year in my International Finance class and I had somehow managed to forget almost everything about it. What this visit made me realize is that the World Bank does more than simply fund specific projects in a number of countries. In class we had discussed how the World Bank worked and how its approach could both be praised and criticized, but we never talked about how funding one small (or large project) could benefit an entire country.

 

After the presentation we went down to the World Bank's cafeteria for lunch. It might sound ridiculous, but I felt sort of awed to be walking among the World Bank's employees and queuing for lunch with them. The cafeteria at the World Bank is pretty amazing too. They have such a large variety of food - they have regular deli food and dishes from all over the world - a very nice dessert buffet and all of this for a reasonable price (very important for us, as unpaid interns). It was also nice to simply sit down and have lunch with (almost) all the postgrads. We are such a culturally diverse group (U.S., Canada, New Zealand, Nigeria, Senegal, Belgium, Russia...) that there is always some interesting discussion going on.

 

Lunch at the World Bank

Lunch at the World Bank

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